Algorithm

Cryptos:

2,117

Exchanges:

10

Marketcap:

$2,215,183,119,872

Volume 24h:

$40,320,567,943

Scrypt

Rank #8

$28,560,960,851

2

0

Winners (undefined)%

24H

Losers (undefined)%

Rank

8

Assets

2

Marketcap

$28,560,960,851

Volume 24h

$1,456,189,482

Winners

2

Overview
Assets

$28,560,960,851

Marketcap

$1,456,189,482

Volume

8

Rank

2

Winners

0

Losers

N/A

Change 24h

N/A

Change 7d

1H

-2.09

%

1D

0

%

1W

0

%

1M

-0.040

%

2M

59.71

%

3M

64.25

%

6M

113.25

%

1Y

48.80

%

About Scrypt

Scrypt is a cryptographic algorithm used in some cryptocurrencies as a proof-of-work consensus mechanism. It was introduced in 2009 by Colin Percival as a way to make mining more memory-intensive and resistant to ASICs (application-specific integrated circuits), which are specialized mining machines that can perform specific calculations much faster than general-purpose hardware.

The Scrypt algorithm is designed to use a lot of memory, making it difficult and expensive to build custom hardware for mining. This makes it more accessible to miners who can use their regular computers or GPUs (graphics processing units) to participate in the network. It is used by some popular cryptocurrencies like Litecoin, Dogecoin, and Feathercoin.

The Scrypt algorithm works by using a large amount of memory to create a "scrypt hash" from a block of data. This hash is then used as the basis for the proof-of-work, with miners competing to find a hash that meets a certain difficulty level. The difficulty level is adjusted regularly to ensure that new blocks are added to the blockchain at a consistent rate.

One advantage of the Scrypt algorithm is that it is more resistant to parallelization than other hashing algorithms like SHA-256, which is used in Bitcoin. This means that mining with GPUs is more efficient than with ASICs, since GPUs have more memory and can perform more calculations in parallel.

However, Scrypt is not completely immune to ASICs, and some manufacturers have created Scrypt-specific ASICs in recent years. This has led to concerns that Scrypt-based cryptocurrencies could become centralized if mining is dominated by a few large ASIC manufacturers.

In conclusion, the Scrypt algorithm is a memory-hard cryptographic algorithm that is used as a proof-of-work consensus mechanism in some cryptocurrencies. It is designed to be resistant to ASIC mining and more accessible to miners using regular computers or GPUs. While it has some advantages over other hashing algorithms, it is not completely immune to ASICs and the potential for centralization that they bring.